Notes


Note    N72         Index
Seemingly moved to Dunmanway, Co. Cork, Ireland

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Note    N73         Index
Seemingly moved to Bantry, Co. Cork, Ireland

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Note    H74         Index
The oldest Fahy family I can find. An assumption has been made that William (1783) & Mary (1803) are also their children but not certain. John (1791) is definitely their child

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Note    N75         Index
Leo is a WWII veteran. He served with the Navy and flew fighter planes in the Pacific Theater. He was a commercial pilot after the war. He and his wife Cynthia live in Somerset Massachusetts right on the river.

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Note    N76         Index
Born at 4 P.M.

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Note    N77         Index
Born at 4:15 P.M.

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Note    N78         Index
Born at about 8:00 am
Wt: 7lbs 6oz -- 21 inches
Red hair
Born in the same hospital as his mother and grandfather

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Note    N79         Index
Born just after 8am
7 lbs 13 oz. - 21 inches

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Note    N80         Index
Born at 8:07 am on Valentines Day.
She was 7lbs, 4 oz.
20.5 inches long

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Note    N81         Index
Moved to USA

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Note    N82         Index
Born at 8:30 A.M.
Weight 8lb 5oz
Height 20 1/2 inches

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Note    N83         Index
The family, initially, lived at Kilbronoge, Schull, Co. Cork, Ireland. About the turn of the century they moved to Ballinphelic, Civil Parish of Liscleary, near Ballinhassig, Co. Cork, Ireland. That farm is now run by May's son Victor and his wife Eleanor. His wife, Martha Frances Moore, died about 1920. He then married Sarah Kingston. At the time he was a staunch Unionist and spoke strongly in favour of the continuance of the rule of Ireland by Great Britain. This together with the local disapproval of the early replacement of a much-loved deceased wife forced him to leave the country under threat of death. He settled on a 14 acre farm at Swanmore, Hampshire, England.
He was always an active and progressive man and the first radio wireless set seen by Eric Nicholson was in his house, bought at the Wembley International Exhibition in 1923. He was very strict. When his second wife died about 1936, his daughter Martha Jane brought him back to their home at Hoddersfield. They came by transatlantic liner from Southampton to Queenstown (Cobh) because he was too ill to travel by train and cross-channel ferry. He was ill with dropsy and the only treatment, at the time, was piercing the legs and draining off the fluid. This was done several times before his heart gave out and he died. He was buried in Douglas Cemetery, Co. Cork, Ireland with his first wife, Martha Frances Moore.

Notes


Note    N85         Index
Born 6:49 PM
Weight 8 lbs 10 oz

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Note    N86         Index
Born @11:17 A.M.
Weight 8 lbs 12 oz

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Note    N87         Index
Assuming this William (1851) is the correct husband for Mary Harrington based on available sources & guesswork