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Widower at time of marriage to Margaret Westland nee Swanton

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Sold Ballyphillips June 1971

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Moved to Australia

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Nurse in Crumlin, Dublin

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Moved to USA

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Moved to USA

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Moved to USA

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26/04/1922 Extract from Wikipedia

On 26 April 1922, a group of IRA men, led by Michael O'Neill, arrived at the house of Thomas Hornibrook at Ballygroman, near Ballincollig, on the outskirts of Cork city, seeking to seize his car
Thomas Hornibrook was in the house at the time along with his son, Samuel Hornibrook, and Herbert Woods (a former Captain in the British Army and MC). Thomas Hornibrook was a former magistrate. His daughter Matilda later described herself and her husband as "staunch Loyalists

Michael O'Neill demanded a part of the engine mechanism (the magneto) that had been removed by Thomas Hornibrook to prevent such theft. Hornibrook refused to give them the part, and after further efforts, some of the IRA party entered through a window. Herbert Woods then shot O'Neill, wounding him fatally. O'Neill's companion Charlie O'Donoghue took him to a local priest who pronounced him dead. The next morning O'Donoghue left for Bandon to report the incident to his superiors, returning with "four military men," meeting with the Hornibrooks and Woods, who admitted to shooting O'Neill.

A local jury found Woods responsible and said that O'Neill had been "brutally murdered in the execution of his duty". Charlie O'Donoghue and Stephen O'Neill, who were present on the night of the killing, both attended the inquest. Some days later, Herbert Woods, Thomas Hornibrook and his son Samuel went missing, and in time were presumed killed] The Morning Post newspaper reported that "about 100" IRA men returned from Bandon with O'Neill's comrades and surrounded the house. It reported that a shootout then ensued until the Hornibrooks and Woods ran out of ammunition and surrendered. This report in the Morning Post is described by Meda Ryan as "exaggerated". Peter Hart writes that the Hornibrooks and Woods surrendered on condition their lives would be spared. When Woods admitted it was he who fired the shot that killed O'Neil, he was beaten unconscious and all three were "driven south into hill country" where they were shot and killed.[ Some time later Hornibrook's house was burned, the plantation cut down and the land was seized.

Alice Hodder, a local Protestant of Crosshaven some 23 miles to the south east, wrote to her mother shortly afterwards of Herbert Woods that, "His aunt and uncle had been subject to a lot of persecution and feared an attack, so young Woods went to stay with them. At 2:30am armed men ... broke in ... Woods fired on the leader and shot him ... They caught Woods, tried him by mock court martial and sentenced him to be hanged ... The brothers of the murdered man then gouged out his eyes while he was alive and then hanged him ... When will the British Government realise that they are really dealing with savages and not ordinary normal human beings?"

The letter was forwarded to Lionel Curtis, Secretary of the Cabinet's Irish Committee, on which he appended the comment "this is rather obsolete".Matilda Woods later testified before the Grants Committee, while applying for £5,000 compensation in 1927, that her husband was drawn and quartered before being killed and that the Hornibrooks were taken to a remote location, forced to dig their own graves and shot dead. Both Ryan and Hart note that Matilda Woods was not in Ireland when Herbert Woods disappeared and there is no record of their bodies being located.

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Moved to USA

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Moved to USA